Kim Davis is the face of religious persecution in America

150903-kim-davis-mug-535p_2a10fb4a29fd25fb6bf13a4680f1087c.nbcnews-ux-2880-1000Kim Davis, the infamous Kentucky clerk who went to jail for refusing to issue marriage licenses after the U.S. Supreme Court ended bans on same-sex marriage across the nation, has been called a martyr by some. Her faith-based “persecution” has been compared to that suffered by the Jews in Nazi Germany, and evidence, according to Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee of the “criminalization of Christianity in our country.”

Her supporters have it backwards, though. Kim Davis is the face of religious persecution in America, I agree, but she is the face of the persecutors, not the persecuted.

She went to jail not for practicing her faith, but for persistent efforts to shove that faith down the throats of those who don’t share it and deny basic constitutional rights to a minority population because her faith tells her they are undeserving.

Davis is not a martyr. She is not embodying the values of Jesus. She is not the second coming of Martin Luther King Jr. No, she is, if anything, merely the frumpier face of the firehose-wielding sheriffs who stood blocking King’s path to Birmingham. Though she is not resorting to violence, she is blocking the rights of others to live their lives in freedom and happiness, because she believes her faith is more important than their civil rights.

This woman should be scorned, not celebrated. She has used her public office to flout the law. She says she has acted under “God’s authority,” but her God does not have jurisdiction over who is issued a civil marriage license in the state of Kentucky. She was elected by the people of that state to serve the people of that state, and follow the laws of the state and the nation.

If she cannot do that, she should resign immediately, and quit persecuting those whose faith differs from hers.

Davis was jailed after being held in contempt of court for refusing to accept court decisions all the way up to the U.S. Supreme Court that she was in the wrong. She was released yesterday because her office had begun issuing licenses in her absence. As long as she doesn’t interfere with that, she will remain free.

If she chooses to impose her religious beliefs on others and refuse to allow her public, secular office to do its job because it opposes those beliefs, then she will rightly end up back behind bars.

But she is not the victim, and she never was. Hers is the face of the persecutor.

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