Hurtling towards completion

The ceiling in the office, finally completed.

The ceiling in the office, finally completed.

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The wet bar, fully trimmed.

So, the big news … the ceiling is finally, finally, finally finished. I’ll be honest, it’s not perfect. The shadow lines that vexed me before remain, though there aren’t as many and they’re spread out more. But the tiles are up straight and it looks much better than it did before. And it’s done. Overall, I think it’s a good-looking ceiling, and the theater especially works well with the copper look. But, if I had to do it over again, I’d go with dry wall. My wife, who had to paint 800-plus tiles with four coats of paint, then touch up the finished ceiling, would most definitely agree.

The flooring, a resilient vinyl plank I got for a good price at Lumber Liquidators, is due in today. I’ll let it acclimate for several days, then start the installation next week. In the meantime, I’ve been preparing ceiling trim and beginning to put some up. I finished trimming the wet bar, which turned out really well. I wasn’t sure how to handle the ceiling trim around the wet bar, but decided to stain the crown moulding around the bar, then transition to the white moulding that will go around the rest of the basement with decorative blocks. They look a little funny now, but when the moulding is in place, I think it’s going to look really nice.

A detail of the back bar trim.

A detail of the back bar trim.

The first section of crown moulding in place.

The first section of crown moulding in place.

The only problem was figuring out how to handle the vertical fluted trim where it met these tapered blocks. After consulting Mark, my DIY mentor, I decided to take a coping saw (a very sharp, flexible hack saw that can, theoretically, make curved cuts in wood). I traced the outline of the tapered portion of the block onto the trim and cut it out, then sanded it down, sometimes using a screw driver or other tool behind the sandpaper to help get the right curve in the wood. It took a lot of trial and error, but I think it turned out pretty well. The picture to the left shows the trim on the left-hand side, under the stained decorative corner molding.

I played around with a scrap piece of crown moulding to try to figure out how to cut the corners. I have a compound miter saw borrowed from a friend that’s supposed to make the job easier, but I could not figure out how to get the proper combination of angles on the bevel and the miter to make it work. Finally, I came across some corner pieces that others said made the process much easier. Made to mount  at either inside or outside corners, the moulding simply slides into these pieces, requiring only straight cuts. It gives the corners an elegant dimensional appearance, to boot, and makes placing the crown moulding much easier. I’ll have all the trim painted today and should have it up either later today or tomorrow.

An elegant solution to a tricky trim spot.

An elegant solution to a tricky trim spot.

Another tricky spot.

Another tricky spot.

I consulted Mark again about a couple of areas where I wasn’t sure what to do with the trim. The entryway to the basement at the top of the stairs wasn’t quite flush with the ceiling. I envisioned some sort of transition to a flat piece of trim there, but Mark came up with a better idea: We ran the moulding across the entryway, then ripped a shorter piece of moulding to go on the stair side. Some blocking and a 1×4 set between them gives the entryway a clean, substantial look.

The soffit in the bathroom was also problematic (as it has been from the beginning). The angle of the soffit was going to be very tough to work around. I didn’t have a clue. Mark offered to come over to see what he could do. He came up with a pretty good solution. The crown moulding extends on the wall from the left far enough to cover the gap between the angled soffit wall and the ceiling and then ends in a return. He cut a piece of wood to fill in the back of the return. On the right, he put in a crown return, again, far enough in to cover the gap. But that still left the gap between the two returns. He cut a piece of 1×4 to fit between them. I’ll post a picture once I have that piece painted and put in place. I’d like to say I helped with this portion, but I was pretty useless. I really have trouble with the three-dimensional thinking needed to work with crown moulding.

Anyway, this is an exciting portion of the project, as it hurtles toward completion. Every day seems to bring significant progress, and soon the floor will be in (assuming, as I must to retain my sanity, that it will go better than the ceiling installation). After that, the base trim goes in, along with the bath fixtures and the wet bar sink hook-up. And then, it will be time for a party.

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