Are you ready for some drywall?

Half the drywall.

Half the drywall.

The preliminary inspections have all been passed. The insulation is in. Finally everything is ready for the drywall.

Which works out well, because I just had 38 sheets of drywall delivered, along with the supplies to hang and finish it. To be honest, it doesn’t look like enough drywall to do the job, but I triple-checked my figures. The stack to the right is just half the drywall. The other half is in the other room.

So, am I ready for this? I guess so. I bought a book about hanging drywall, and have been asking friends and advisors for pointers. I have a dimpler driver, a special bit that’s  supposed to make it easy to set drywall screws just right: So the screw ends up just below the surface of the panel without breaking the paper. That’s important because the paper is what keeps the panel’s structural integrity intact against the pressure of the screw. If you break the paper, you have to set another screw next to it, and hope you get it right the second time. You want the screw head just below the surface so you can mud over it so the screw doesn’t show through the finish.

I’ve got a few other miscellaneous drywall tools: a rasp, a lifter and top-rated drywall knife. I’m most concerned about cutting holes for outlets and switches and things without messing anything up. Accuracy’s very important with that to avoid  having to patch around a box if the gap’s too wide.

Oops.

Oops.

Before I get started, though, I have a couple minor framing issues to take care of. Remember the angled soffit in the bathroom? (Sure, you do.) I had redone that with a better angle for a smaller soffit. But as I was looking at things earlier in the week, I realized I’d done a really horrible job mounting the studs, or at least one of them. It was at a visible angle, and was far from level with the other stud. So, I need to get that put properly in place. Then I realized another mistake I made in framing the bathroom: I forgot to put in studs for nailing the interior drywall to the corner.

Big pain

Big pain

That won’t be a problem on the right side. I can just put a stud in. But there’s an electric box mounted to the left, with a lot of cables stapled in place. Putting in a stud would mean pulling the box off (which often tears them apart) and resecuring a bunch of cables. Instead, after consulting with one of my advisers, I’m going to rip some small 2X4 pieces down to 2X2s and screw them to the stud at the appropriate spacing to use as nailers for the drywall. That should work just fine.

Finally, I need to get out the reciprocating saw and take out a piece of top plate near the entrance into the basement and put up another plate closer to the existing entryway. It’ll make for a much smoother transition for the drywall there.

And then, I’ll be ready to start hanging. I hope to be able to report significant progress by the end of the weekend.

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